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Sunday, January 15, 2012

Rusted Garden Seed Sale: These are Weekly Seeds Sales that Go-Away!

The Rusted Garden will be selling seeds throughout the year. This page is for weekly sales that won't last.

There won't be a lot of pictures on this page but most of the seeds offered can be found in pictures around my blog. I only sell what I grow. The seed deals here will be very cheap and will change weekly.

I prepack these seeds and typically only have a couple packages for sale. This is first come first serve. Thanks! Shipping and all that calculated at checkout. Details can be found at the Veggie Seeds tab.



Tomatoes: 14 Variety Sampler Package

You get 14 varieties of Tomatoes for $11.85. 
That's under .90 cents a pack.

This is the sample package deal... enough seeds for the season of every tomato variety I have at this point. It is a great way to get a little of everything. These tomatoes will cover the early and late seasons. All sizes represented. I have grown them all and will be growing them all again this year.

You get 15 to 25+ seeds of the following tomatoes:

25+ Baxter's Bush Tomato Seeds - Determinate Cherry
25+ Sarah's Galapagos Tomato Seeds - Indeterminate Currant
25+ Glacier Tomato Seeds - Determinate Early Cherry
25+ Black Plum Heirloom Tomato Seeds - Determinate  Mid Season 2 oz Plum Shape

25+ Homestead Tomato Seeds - Determinate 6-8 oz  Medium Fruit
25+ Bonnie Best Heirloom Tomato Seeds - Indeterminate 10 oz Fruit
15+ Abe Lincoln Heirloom Tomato Seeds - Indeterminate 10-12 oz Fruit

15+ Aussie Heirloom Tomato Seeds - Indeterminate 1-2 Pound Beefsteak
15+ Orange Jubilee Tomato Seeds - Indeterminate Large Orange
15+ Brandywine Suddath Strain Tomato Seeds - Indeterminate 1-2 Pound Pink Beefsteak
15+ Brandywine Red Heirloom Tomato Seeds - Indeterminate 1-2 Pound Pink Beefsteak
15+ Delicious Tomato Seeds - Indeterminate 12-16 oz Large



25+ Russian Bicolor Oxheart Tomato Seeds - Indeterminate 12-24 oz Yellow Red Large
15+ Jersey Devil Heirloom Tomato Seeds - Indeterminate 6 inch Paste Tomato (Horn Like)


 

12 comments:

  1. Hi there... thanks for your suggestion... I guess i will ask my neighbor if i can grow some of my plants in her back yard.

    I am really interested in buying the above set of seeds. Is there shipment to India and can you please tell me till what time these seeds will for sale on your blog?

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  2. Hello. They are available now. You just click anything I have to ADD to CART. The Shipping Costs are added to the end. Just select your Country or area from the shipping menu. The shipping cost is $4.50 for that order. Orders over $20.00 are $6.75. If you order over $20.00, Ill add some free seeds to offset the shipping costs. Thanks.

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  3. If this is more than I can plant this year how long should these seeds stay good?

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    Replies
    1. If you seal them in simple container and keep them out of the sun they can easily last 2-3 years. Some people put them in a jar with a lid and keep them in the refrigerator. The key is not to let them dry out. Each seed has a bit of moisture in the center of it believe it or not.

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  4. Hi Gary,

    The 21th or 22nd of March (nine or ten days ago) I planted 48 different tomato seed varieties (on 2x24 pot trays) which I bought from many different sellers, and all but seven varieties have germninated (yet). 90% of the seeds came up the pot 4 and 3 days ago and the few others that didn't sprout then did the two last days. I planted five of your different varieties, and none of them have germinated yet (!), which I find very odd. Have you experienced that your seeds are germinating poorer than expected this year? Do you have different storage of seeds and that I possibly received seeds from a storage gone bad? Thanks for your answer.

    I planted three seeds of each variety from all sellers, but with Sarah's Galapagos I planted five seeds, since I mean to remember it was a bit slow on germinating. Also with the seed varieties that have germinated, all three seeds of each variety germinated.

    And please don't delete this message; you must tolerate feedback that is not the most pleasant to deal with as well.

    Best regards,

    Ken Solvang from Norway

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    Replies
    1. I can tolerate it. The pictures on my blog today are all the same seeds. They are germinated nicely. I'm sure you will have germinatiing seeds in a few more days. Mine fell in between 5 and 11 days at 70 plus degrees.

      I planted 3 seeds to a cell and they look pretty good. Check out my last two blogs it is the same seeds.


      Gary

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  5. Good to hear that it is still hope, and that I didn't receive seeds from another stash gone bad :-) I wrote incorrectly that I had planted three seeds from each variety. I planted mostly two seeds. And where I planted more than two seeds, I marked the name plates with that info. I have checked over again and Sarah's Galapagos got five as I earlier wrote. What got me worried was when I noticed that a tomato variety I bought more than two years ago ("Hundreds of Thousands"), which I had mistreated by having it stay light and warm, germinated so well. I planted four seeds of it, and three of them germinated two days ago, which surprised me.

    I have had a bit more fluctuating temperatures - between 65-74 degrees Fahrenheit(18-25 degrees celcius.) I haven't had the tomato pots/trays under direct light, but have them three foot away from the intensive light. And I have put timer on the light which turns on the light at 6 AM and off at 9.30 PM.

    Now while I have your attention, I grab my chance to bomb you with questions ;-) .. What amount of hours of light a day do you recommend for seedlings? Also should it be colder at night? I mean to remember that seedlings should stay at a colder room and under bright light as not to be thin and long. Also: Do you advice me to put the tomato seed trays (I think of those that haven't germinated yet of course) directly under the plant lights?

    I know that a lot of plant species (their seeds) gain from darkness, while a lot less species really need seed to germinate while other seeds gain from 12 hours light/12 hours dark, and I must admit that I haven't read anywhere on which sides of the scale that the tomato seeds (darkness or light.)

    Thanks for your earlier response. It made me much more secure about the seeds going to germinate. If for some reason they will not germinate, I will of course plant seeds of the same varieties over again. Still time to do that.

    I will of course tell you when/if the seeds germinate. Couldn't let the other post of mine be like question here.

    Ken

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    1. The 'sarahs galapagos' and 'aussie' took the longest. If you have time and room, I would plant them again now to save time but I really think they should germinate. All mine have.

      My grow closet stays above 70 and with the lights on probable gets to higher 70's. So my seeds may sprout a bit faster.

      Now for seedlings... they should be inches away not feet for light that is unless you have some super intensive light source. I just use high lumen flourescent lights. My last few blog entries show my light set up.

      I recommend 10 to 14 hours of direct light but that is inches like 3-6 inches from the plant. Looks like you have the 15 hours which is great. I am wondering about the distance of you light source though. I will be putting up pics of the tomates I have a 13 days old. You can compare.

      I never heard about cooler night temps and don't bother with worrying about that. Cool nights don't cause tall long plants or 'legginess'.

      Tall thin plants come from the light source not being strong enough and the plants grow tall and thin to reach the light.

      Yes put the tomatoes that haven't germinated directly under lights and see if you can warm them a bit. They should be fine.

      Thanks

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  6. Good evening Gary,

    thank you for leading me to the easy route on how to use the light source correctly (instead of I doing search on the internet - lazy me.) I don't have the seedlings feet away from the light, but the trays with the seeds that haven't sprouted are. (As I mentioned, I have learned that most seeds require darkness for germination, whereas some types of plant seeds are really dependent on light for the same process.) The moment the seeds show themselves I give them light. And the light is probably ten inches away, possibly more. Just ordinary fluorescent tube. Well, two of them on two different shelves. One weaker than the other. I chose white light tubes, and the strongest has 2x58W tubes, while the weakest has 2x36W tubes.

    Actually I read years ago that some cooler temperature at nights combined with enough hours of strong light each day cause strong robust plants, not the other way around where colder temperature causes weak plants. Sorry if I was unclear about it. It makes some sense since there are cooler nights in nature.

    It was night when I posted my last message to you, and all day has passed and now it's late night again, and I almost forgot to come here to tell you the good news: Of your five varieties that I planted, three of them have come up the soil. I planted Black Plum, Orange Jubilee, Jersey Devil, Brandywine Suddath and Sarah's Galapagos. Sarah's Galapagos and Brandywine Suddath is yet to show themselves - but then we know that Sarah's Galapagos is later than the other.

    I still find it a puzzle that exactly the varieties that I received from you were the very last of all tomato varieties to sprout. If we change the name of the varieties into numbers, and we consider that all your numbers (varieties) stood out, statistically it's like winning big time in lottery. Anyway, you know the saying that the best is saved at last; as you know I was very excited about Sarah's Galapagos, and also I became very curious about Orange Jubilee :-)

    Thanks again for your guidance and have a great evening!

    (Will also come with an update on when the last two tomato varieties show themselves.)

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Im glad they are up. The Sarahs will be smaller when they do. I read your order for other seeds and figured they must have come up. Thanks for that.

      Ill send you a bunch of extra stuff for the future. I have a lot of seeds and appreciate the business.

      I am curious about the delay in the sprouting.

      I am getting a thermometer to take the temp of my grow-light station. By keeping the lights a few inches off my plants from the start, I bet that warms them well enough they sprout faster. Ah science...

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  7. Update: Sarah's Galapagos showed itself today. Just a few hour ago I could spot the first of five from seeds that I planted. Meaning it took exactly 22 days for the first seed to snow itself (!) I really didn't have it on a cold place; the temperature fluctuated at first and had an average of 70 degrees F for the first week. The second week it was stable temperature around 72-72 degrees, and when it didn't show by then, I had it on a lot warmer place the last three days, with a stable temprature of 79-81 degrees. I am amazed on how warm temperatures Sarah's Galapagos needed.

    Well, now all five varieties that I planted have germinated.

    I promised I would come with an update, so all is well now.

    I guess it is nice that future buyers of Sarah's Galapagos by reading this can have in mind that this variety may take very long time to germinate, if not receiving much higher room temperatures (than other varieties need.)

    So now I wait in excitement for Sarah's G. to grow well so that I can enjoy it during the summer months :-)

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    Replies
    1. Thanks. You know last year seeds took nearly that long. I apprieciate you sticking with it. I said they take longer but now I can use your work with a time .... which I appreciate.

      22 days seems like forever with tomatoes. They grow slower too to start but I am serious when I say the plant might produce more then you can eat

      If you have room I would plant a 2nd wave. Just in case. Why mine germinated faster and in full, I can only attribute to having them close to grow lights that made them really warm. Maybe a few degrees matters with this variety.

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