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Monday, February 28, 2011

PURCHASE: 3 Kinds of Jalapenos (Yellow, Purple, and Green) and More




SOLD OUT
Cost $5.25 View all My Seeds for Sale by Clicking This Link
Paypal Only. No Shipping Fees.

If you are curious about how they look, a google search by name turns up dozens of photos. You can see the fruit, plants, and size.

You will get 30 plus seeds of each variety below, except for the Jaloro. They will each be packed in a small letter envelope and sent in a larger letter envelope. These seeds are packed for 2010 and come from bulk puchases I made from multiple seed companies. In some instances they may be seeds I colleceted from last years plants. There are no shipping costs.

Have A Great Season!

If you time it right you can make salsa with orange, red, purple, yellow, and green jalapenos. Nice for the eyes.

Jaloro Jalapeno 20+ seeds (Note 20 seeds)
It is the first yellow jalapeno developed out of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. The fruit is described as a beatiful golden yellow that turns orange, then red. It grows on compacts plants. Heat is equal to your standard jalapeno and it is resistant to 6 pepper viruses. 70 days maturity.


Purple Jalapeno 30+ seeds
The fruit of this pepper turns dark purple and stays that way for a long time. It will eventually turn red. They are a little bit larger then your standard jalapeno and carry the same heat. They color contrast looks great is salsas. 75 days maturity.



Jalapeno M 30+ seeds
Your standard green jalapeno that grows 3 inches long and is about 1 and 1/2 inch wide. It stays dark green for a long time and then turns red. It's great for salsas, nachos, stuffed, and all your hot dish needs. 75 days maturity.


Sweet Banana 30+ seeds
They grow 5-6 inches long and start out light green, change to yellow and orange, and finally red. They are sweet with no heat. Great contrast in salsas and great all around use, cooked or raw. 72 days maturity.




Saturday, February 26, 2011

Seed Starting Indoors: Pictures

Starting seeds indoors is easy, very easy. It will save you quite a bit of money too and it allows you to germinate plants you might not find in your local area.


You need to buy seed starting mix. It is inexpensive. It is sterile. You can make it yourself if you choose. If you make it yourself you should follow 1 part peat moss: 1part vermiculite: 1 part perlite. You can exclude 1 of the latter two. You would also need to put lime in the mix to manage the ph of the peat moss. I used to make it. Now I just buy it on sale. You also need a seed starting tray.

Fill the tray with seed starting mix. And this is important, pack each cell of mix down with your thumb and refill. You want to make sure the mix is nicely packed in each cell. I you don't your seeds can drop to the bottom. I prefer to have a lot of seed starting mix in each cell because I over plant my cells.



Next pick out what you want grow. You can follow the instructions exactly as the pack states but I find you can plant seeds 1/4 inch down. The only ones you don't want to bury are seeds that have instructions to press them on the surface or lightly cover.  I am planting lettuce, basil and foxglove.




I am mixing three packs of large sweet green leaf basil together and putting (yes) 10+ seeds in each cell.  Why? They will grow just fine and like water. If I keep the cells moist, the basil and lettuce will grow well. Once the plants are large enough, I divide them up. Lettuce and basil are easy to divide. You can gently break the clumps of starting soil apart and divide them 1 plant at a time if you want. Not all plants  divide that easily. If you enlarge the photo, you can see the cells are over planted with seeds. Remember nature doesn't drop seeds on inch apart.






Once the seeds are in on the soil, I use a popsicle stick to mix them down to about 1/4 of an inch and then press the soil down with my thumb. This ensures good soil to seed contact for germination.








Each group of 9 cells gets labelled with a stick. Next I planted foxglove. In my hand there is probably 500 seeds. They all wont germinate. But they will be planted heavily in the cells. I just break them into bunches when I transplant them into cups. I break them again when the get bigger. And then 1 more time before they go into the ground. Foxglove is lightly covered with soil. Just drop a little mix on them and press it down with your thumb.






Never water from the top. Never... no never. Don't do it. It is too labor intensive. It will wash mix and seeds out of the cell and it will cause damping off, a fungus disease. Water from the bottom. Fill the tray up nearly halfway with warm water. Make sure the tray is on a level surface. In about 2-3 hours your tray will  absorb the water. You are good to go on watering now for 7-10 days. When the cells look dry...fill from the bottom. Dump out excess water if you get carried away.





This is really easy. Give it a try. I do use a growing station. The light stay on 12 hours.
Here are some pictures of seeds I started about a month ago.













Selling Million Dollar Space in New York



This guest post from Daryl Glass

The personalities and attitudes of Selling New York are fabulous! The show is real estate, but it's the drama that enfolds that keeps you coming back. Selling New York is on satellite TV that I got after coming across this Satellite tv DVR Deals comparison and it is staged like it is on a Hollywood film set. The agents are dressed in uptown New York style and though the title says New York, the property that they show and sell is mainly in Manhattan, never in upstate or the boroughs. None of the properties would sell for under a million.

What you get to see are the dream condos and lofts that have been redeveloped and rehabbed from old warehouses on the top side of Manhattan, and typically running from 3 million on up. Agent parties with the high society set in from Europe for a few days and meeting at all the right parties and restaurants, is the drama that takes place before a property is purchased. Oftentimes the buyers are so preoccupied with their own lives that they send someone to take pictures of the unit before they'll even come to look at it! Oh what money won't buy in high society New York and if I had an extra ten million to spend on a living space, it just might be on the top floor in downtown Manhattan, overlooking the city and the river. Beautiful!

Thursday, February 24, 2011

It is Time (almost) for Container Peas

It's time. Well almost time to plant peas. Peas are a cool weather crop. They can take a chill and a light freeze. If you are planting peas you have to make sure your garden is not frozen and not soggy. This can take some time in Maryland. Usually March 15, is the time peas and cold weather crops can get in the ground.

The alternative is to use containers. They can be planted March 1st, if the nights look like they will be above 30 degrees. Containers need to have drainage. You don't want soggy soil or the peas will rot. Below is a link to 18 gallon container gardening. I use it for tomato plants when the weather warms up. I use them for peas before the tomatoes. It is a great way to boost nitrogen in you soil, come time for tomato planting. Peas fix nitrogen to their roots from the atmosphere. So, back to peas, what do you need to plant peas in containers?

You need pea seeds, a container that has a 12 inch diameter minimum, and something for the peas to climb on. You also need a minimum of 6 hours of full sunlight. The more sun the better.  Plant 4 seeds in the container equally spaced apart. The container can manage 3 plants. If all four plants sprout, remove the weakest plant. You will need a small tomato cage if available or 3 sticks that are about 4 feet high. If you are only using a 12 inch diameter container, this might look overwhelming. Place the sticks against the sides of  the container to form a triangle. Push them to the bottom and tie the tops together to form a tee-pee. Each plant should be trained up a post.

In the above example you are only using three seeds because the depth of the above container is usually also 12 inches. If you plant in larger containers that have 24 inches or more depth, you can plant the seeds 2 inches apart. In this case you might need additional sticks for the peas to grow on. Tending peas is easy. Just make sure the soil doesn't dry out in your containers and you will have a full crop of peas in no time. You can also tuck some lettuce plants in the container. One or two per 12 inch pot. Again more lettuce can be placed in containers with greater depth of soil. I'll address lettuces later.

Link to 18 gallon container gardening:
http://knol.google.com/k/how-to-grow-tomatoes-in-an-18-gallon-storage-container-in-pictures#

If you find my blog helpful please join it. Thanks.

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

12 Benefits of Using a Raised Bed: Part 2 of 2

12 Benefits of Using a Raised Bed: Part 2 of 2
By Gary Pilarchik LCSW-C

Easier to tend and manage:
You can raise a bed up to two feet or even higher. This requires less bending. Once the soil is prepared little work is needed to maintain it. Since you don't step in it, the soil stays loose and workable all year round. It is also easier to reach in and tend to your plants and pick your garden produce. Make sure the garden box is only 4 feet in width. Your arms have a 2 foot reach. This way you can reach all parts of the raised bed. You could also raise the bed up to your waste if needed. This can help gardeners with knee and back issues.


Earlier start and later finish:
You can start gardening earlier because raised bed gardens warm more quickly in the season when compared to a flat earth garden. You can garden later into the season because raised bed gardens stay warmer as Fall arrives. This allows you to have more fun and more vegetables. This reason in itself is a great reason.


Saves time and money and they look great:
Your cost over time diminishes. It costs money to build the raised beds initially but you save money over time by only concentrating resources to where the vegetables are actually going to be grown. You save yourself time by only working the area that will actually grow vegetables. They look good and really help create an organized garden. Less mud too. You can mulch between raised beds for a clean working area and you will never have to step onto muddy garden soil.


Create a cold frame:
You can add a glass, plastic, or a plexiglas cover to a raised bed. You simply build up the frame by a foot or more above the soil in the raised bed. You now have growing space for greens, radishes and other cold tolerant vegetables. The frame cover produces solar heat during the day and keeps the cold out during the night. More growing season is always welcomed. You can use the cold frame in the beginning and at the end of the seasons.


Helps you manage crop rotation and planting:
Crop rotations can get confusing if you follow them to perfection. Raised bed gardens can be numbered and easily tracked and managed for crop rotation. They can be easily set up for pesticide use or organic use of weed, disease, and insect control. The raised beds can be broken down into square units for organizing your entire planting routine. Because there are typically 4 x 8 feet, you can grid out what you want to grow.


Solarizing and disease management:
Solarizing is the process of heating soil for a period of time to kill weeds, disease, and pests. This process is easily done with raised beds. You can create several 4x8 foot plastic sheets and set them on the bed for solarization. You also have 2 foot paths between beds this creates a diseas and insect barrier. If needed during emergency management times, you can destroy plants in one or two raised beds to prevent spread of disease and insects. Hopefully, you won't need to use this benefit.

Gardening Around The Country: Dreaming of Land and Avacados




Another snowy morning commute and a top speed of 20 miles per hour on 95, has me dreaming once again of the Spring. The Winter brings snow delays and the Spring brings sunshine delays on the highways. I am so ready for a sunshine delay. Bring on the sun and the cool weather garden! I have written several blog entries myself on cool weather gardening but I wanted to bring in another article I found, notice the raised bed and cool weather plants. The key to cool weather gardening is starting early and replanting late. In Maryland you can start in March and go into November with a bit of luck and preparation.

Maryland has a great gardening season and as much as I am ready for Spring, I do like experiencing the four seasons. Gardening throughout the U.S. varies greatly from a short season in Alaska to gardening year around in southern California. The cold weather isn't enough to drive me to the west coast (yet) but I do keep track of land and housing prices around the country.  Mission Beach real estate, in the San Diego area, shows some absolutely beautiful communities and the area is showing signs of an upswing. Inventories are dropping and activity is returning to what was once one of the most "pricey areas" in the U.S. If I can't plant now, I can dream of luxury and warm weather. Why not dream of the San Diego area?

There are standard crops that we can grow all over the U.S and then there are only things that can grow in specific zones. I would love to be able to grow avocado trees. I can't. I need the zone of southern California, hence my dream. I try to grow broccoli and cauliflower in Maryland but it has bolted 3 years in a row now. I think I need a longer cool season. The best thing about gardening is you can do it anywhere, be it in the ground, in containers on a deck, or on your windowsill. Now if this snow would just go away, I could quit dreaming and get digging. Four more weeks and the peas go in the ground!

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

PURCHASE: 5 Kinds of 1 Pounder Tomatoes Plus from The Rusted Garden





Cost $4.50 View All My Seeds for Sale by Clicking This Link
Paypal Only. No Shipping Fees.

You might just want to grow - just the big ones. These tomatoes are 1 pound to 2 pound producers. The Delicious variety boasts a record 7 pound tomato. I can say I have grown a few 2 pound Delicious but I was not about to pick off other tomatoes just to let one fruit grow. There too tasty!

You will get 5 types of large tomato fruit seeds and sweet banana pepper seeds. You can't live on tomatoes alone.

If you are curious about how they look, a google search by name turns up dozens of photos. You can see the fruit, plants, and size.

You will get 30 plus seeds of each variety below. They will each be packed in a small letter envelope and sent in a larger letter envelope. These seeds are packed for 2010 and come from bulk puchases I made from multiple seed companies. In some instances they may be seeds I colleceted from last years plants.

Have A Great Season!


The Five Varietes You Will Get:

Brandywine (Sudduth's) (Heirloom 2 pound fruit/Pink-Red)
This is widely known as the original Pink Brandywine strain, obtained by Ben Quisenberry from Dorris Sudduth Hill. Many gardeners consider this seed the best Brandywine with fruit that is superior in taste and smoothness. It produces 1 to 2 pound pink beefsteaks with a sweet flavor that has made popular. Indeterminate 85 days.

Delicious (2 pound fruit. I grow it every year/Red)
Huge red fruit is smooth, nearly solid and often weighs more than 2 lbs. Great taste and meaty. This is the variety that holds the world record for the largest tomato ever grown. Indeterminate 75 days.

Mexico (Heirloom 1 pound fruit/Pink-Red)
Very large plants have an excellent set of huge, dark pink fruits with outstanding taste. It is unusual to find a variety that bears such large fruit in generous numbers and maintains such superb taste. Plant produces 1 lbers throughout the growing season. A family heirloom brought from a Mexican family living in the Midwest. Indeterminate 80 days.

Mortgage Lifter (Heirloom 12 oz to 1 1/2 pounds Red)Rumor has it a farmer paid off his mortgage by selling the beefsteak plant at $1 a plant in the 50's. This plant does not stop growing and produces tomatoes up to 1 1/2 pounds. Indeterminate 90 days.

Super Beefsteak (Your summer standard 1 pound sandwich tomato)
The tried and true beafsteak tomato that brings you 1 pound fruits. Indetermintate 80 days.


6 seed types, 30+ seeds each type.

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

12 Benefits of Using a Raised Bed: Part 1 of 2

12 Benefits of Using a Raised Bed: Part 1 of 2
By Gary Pilarchik LCSW-C


Higher vegetable yields:

You will get 2x's the vegetable production out of a raised bed than a standard flat earth bed of the same dimensions. You can plant vegetables closer together because of better soil conditions. The higher yields are possible because you are protecting the gardening area from compaction. If a vegetable plant can grow downward and outward without their roots being stomp on and compacted, the plant will thrive. Thriving plants produce more. Plants can be grown closer together because there is plenty of room for their roots to extend deeply downward. They don't compete for space.


Better soil:

You can add garden soil, organic matter and all the other good stuff to your raised bed in a focused and controlled manner. Soil compaction is greatly reduced, as mentioned above, because you never step in the bed. Soil compaction inhibits plant growth, oxygen uptake, and water circulation. Because you are framing off the specific growing area, you can better control what you put in it. It is much easier to add sand and organic matter to clay soil when you have a framed area. You can also purchase bulk soil delivery from your local nursery and fill the raised bed. You dig out the "bad soil" and dump in the new. For some areas it is easier to remove earth then amend it. Raised beds make this task much easier.


Better drainage:

Your raised bed will drain more quickly and be less prone to staying soggy and thus promoting disease and seed rotting. Typically you should dig a raised bed down at least 2 feet. By doing this you create a garden bed that will drain water from the top on the soil to the bottom. This is a much healthier environment for your seeds and plants.


Better air circulation and more sunshine:

Raised beds tend to get better circulation and more sun depending how you set them up. Air circulation helps cut down on plant diseases. The standard raised bed plot should be 4 feet by 8 feet. You create the width of 4 feet because your arms have about a 2 foot reach. This allows you to tend to the entire garden from the surrounding walking paths. You don't need to step in it. By creating 18 inch to 2 foot walking paths between the raised beds, you create space for air circulation and more sunshine. Circulation and sunshine are paramount in disease prevention and strong growth.


Better water conservation:

You only water where the vegetables are growing. You can also install slow drip soaker hoses in the bottom of your raised bed garden. If you dig out 2 feet of soil you can place a slow drip soaker hose in the bottom of it. It should be put in - in a snaking pattern. It has to be deep enough your spade won't reach it. By focusing your watering habit directly to the vegetable growing area, you will save money and water. Depending on how much of an edge you put on your raised bed, you can also flood the top of it. Simply fill it up with water and then let it sink away. Because you amended the soil the water will use gravity to get deep into the bed. This helps prevent damage from soil that dries out to deeply during the hot summer months.


Easier weed control:

Weeding is easier and because you can plant more plants in a raised bed garden, they tend to shade out weeds. The soil is loose. It is much easier to "fluff" it and turn it and thus burry weeds. Pulling weeds is easier because as mention the soil is so loose. Dandelions come out with a full root! Mulching for weed control is less expensive because it is done in a targeted area. Mulching not only controls weeds, it helps conserve moisture. And mulch will add organic matter to your garden when it gets turned at the end of the season.

Sunday, February 13, 2011

Photo Update of My Seedlings

I started my seedling as early as 1/22/2011. They have been getting 12 hours of light. In this picture left to right are my snapdragons, oregano, and lavender.


Seedlings Planted 1/22/2011



Below, left to right, coleus, garlic chives, and rosemary.

Seedling Planted 1/22/2011
Next, left to right... back left chard, front left chives. Followed by parsley and red kale. Then back right is red saliva an in the front are my cold weather tomatoes.

Seedlings Planted 1/30/2011

Close up of the tomatoes:





Thursday, February 10, 2011

To Anonymous: Update on My Aspirin Tomato Experiment.

Well it is true I am a gardener and not a scientist. My data is observational. The experiment ended up being 2 - 81 mg aspirin in the planting hole and 3 - 81 mg aspirin tablets in a 2 gallon watering can. I watered with aspirin from 1st week of June till last week of July, 1 or 2 a week. This watering was to wet the leaves not to fully water the plant. Watering occurred during the day.

In addition to this I was more vigilant about my sulfur-epsom salt sprayings on my tomatoes and cucumbers.

The end result was significantly noticeable improvements. There was less blight, less powdery mildew, and the blight that came didn't damage the plants as badly. I did end up having a huge white-fly problem this year. Never had that in the 10+ years of gardening.

I can't say if the aspirin or the spraying or a combination of both made the difference... but the diseases last year were less damaging to my crops. Some tomatoes had no signs of blight what-so-ever. That is good.

I will use aspirin again.

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

PURCHASE: 8 Kinds of Tomato Seeds from The Rusted Garden







Cost $7.50 View All My Seeds for Sale by Clicking This Link

No Shipping Fees. Paypal Only.

I try to keep my gardening at zero cost though I never succeed... it is fun. These are the plants I will be growing. If your interested check out my ebay auctions. These are the seeds I will start indoors and then sell in my area for $1.


It is getting close to seed starting time. I wish you all good luck with the 2011 season.

I am auctioning 8 kinds of tomato seeds, it is a mix of all you will need for the growing season and then some. You will get small fruit, large fruit, and patio container tomato seeds. Don't forget heirlooms and different colors. Sandwich type, salad type, salsa, sauce and just plain old snacking tomatoes.

You will get 30 plus seeds of each variety below. They will each be packed in small letter envelopes and sent in a larger letter envelope. These seeds are packed for 2011 and come from bulk puchases I made from multiple seed companies. In some instances they may be seeds I colleceted from last years plants.

Have A Great Season!


The Eight Varietes You Will Get:

Black Plum (Heirloom small teardrop/Mahagony)
Small elongated-oval fruits are deep mahogany and sweet and fruity. Plants grow to 6 feet and produce through the season. Indeterminte 80 days.

Brandywine (Sudduth's) (Heirloom 2 pound fruit/Pink-Red)
This is widely known as the original Pink Brandywine strain, obtained by Ben Quisenberry from Dorris Sudduth Hill. Many gardeners consider this seed the best Brandywine with fruit that is superior in taste and smoothness. It produces 1 to 2 pound pink beefsteaks with a sweet flavor that has made popular. Indeterminate 85 days.

Delicious (2 pound fruit. I grow it every year/Red)
Huge red fruit is smooth, nearly solid and often weighs more than 2 lbs. Great taste and meaty. This is the variety that holds the world record for the largest tomato ever grown. Indeterminate 75 days.

Jersey Devil (Heirloom Salsa and Sauce/Bright Red)
A tomato variety with 4 to 6 inch long red fruits shaped like banana peppers. They taper to a point. Jersey Devil horns.The tomatoes are very meaty and sweet with few seeds. It is great for sauces, salsas, or even eating fresh. Large yeilds. Indeterminate 80 days.

Mexico (Heirloom 1 pound fruit/Pink-Red)
Very large plants have an excellent set of huge, dark pink fruits with outstanding taste. It is unusual to find a variety that bears such large fruit in generous numbers and maintains such superb taste. Plant produces 1 lbers throughout the growing season. A family heirloom brought from a Mexican family living in the Midwest. Indeterminate 80 days.

Orange Russian (Heirloom Oxheart shape/Bicolor: yellow and orange)
A bicolor oxheart tomato with 8 ozs. or more fruits. They are heart-shaped with smooth yellow flesh marbled inside and out with streaks of red. They are delicious, sweet, and meaty with very few seeds. Indeterminate 80 days.

Patio Hybrid (Your container cherry tomato/Red)
A dwarf variety for growing on patios, decks, or wherever garden space is limited. It is great for upside-down planting. Plants 2 ft. tall and produce large number 3 to 4 oz. tomatoes. Determinate 70 days.

Super Beefsteak (Your summer standard 1 pound sandwich tomato)
The tried and true beafsteak tomato that brings you 1 pound fruits.





Cost $7.50 No Shipping Fees. Paypal Only.





View Your Order and Check Out Now

Monday, February 7, 2011

How to Build a Hot-House Tomato Cage: REVISITED

I mentioned I am growing cold tolerant tomatoes as I write. The idea is to get tomatoes in May. This is the article I wrote that shows you how to use a tomato cage, plastic wrap, and milk jugs to build a hot-house. Try it out. It worked for me last year.


Check this link for the full article  How to Build a Hot-House Tomato Cage

Sunday, February 6, 2011

TIP: Use Foil to Surround Your Growing Stations

I included a picture and was going to do a step by step but it really isn't that hard to use foil to reflect light back to your planted seedlings.

Use the reflective side to reflect light inward and tape the dull side edges with duct tape to give the foil strength.

You can see from the picture I have foil across the top of two light fixtures. It covers the gap and reflects the light back down.

I have flaps in the front an back that I can move. The front flap is of course closed in the picture. I also use side flaps. It doesn't have to be perfect but by doing this you really reflect a lot of lot back toward your plants.

NO Foil Used to Reflect Light


Foil Flaps and Covers


More Perennials in, Kohlrabi, and Progress Photos

The seedlings are doing very well.  Right to left you have kales up and chard. Next, you have snapdragons, oregano, and lavender. Finally there is coleus, garlic chives and hidden in the back is rosemary. They were planted on 1/22 and it is now 2/6. They are getting12 hours of timed light.





As I mentioned I found 72 cell seed starting trays for $4. Of course! I have to use them. I added some more perennials. Gloriosa Daisy which are yellows and the key is they bloom after the white daisies die out. I also planted a new plant for butterflies,  Jupiter's Beard. I added French Lavender which has winged flowers on their flower tips (see pic). I also planted my Kohlrabi's which I wrote about in the summer. It is an outstanding vegetable. I planted a red and green variety.



Saturday, February 5, 2011

BigLots: Great Prices on Gardening Supplies and Seed Starting Trays

A BigLots opened in our area this year. The stuff ah... But the garden supplies just went in. If you have one near you it is worth the trip.

They had 72 cell seed starting trays for $4. They typically run $8 or more. The watering tray, planting cells, and lid for $4. They are a tad more flimsy then some others I have paid $8 for but they hold the planting medium and water perfectly fine.

I am hoping they get seeds soon. Seeds are seeds and cheap is good. Just thought I'd share.  The more you save in supplies the more seeds you can buy later. It is an addiction.

Friday, February 4, 2011

Beat the Snow with Hawaii and Seed Catalogs



When I have time to pass because the gardening season is covered in snow, I search the Internet. I don't only keep a garden blog but also keep a blog that deals with political themes under the disguise of humanity capacity. While pursuing that interest, I encounter a financial, real estate, and political blog that got me to chase the snow away by fantasizing about a vacation in Hawaii or better yet owning land in Hawaii. The blog had many interesting articles about the current state of the real estate markets around the US. It was an upfront fair assessment of the markets.

If I can't make it to Hawaii and the Internet has nothing to offer, the other way I pass time during snow days, is by ordering seed catalogs. The best way to prepare for the new season, while you wait for the new season is to view seed catalogs. One of  the best places to shop on line and order a free catalog is at Tomato Growers. They are packed full of color photos, their prices are fair, and they are very reliable. Another place I have found is Park Seeds. Unlike Tomato Growers, they have all kinds of vegetables, flowers, tools, and other elements of gardening. If you have time, why not order their catalogs. It is free and it helps pass the winter. If you are thinking about the warmth of Hawaii and thumbing through the catalogs, well it's almost like Spring is around the corner.

Thursday, February 3, 2011

Eight Kinds of Tomato Seeds: Available From The Rusted Garden





Click Add to Cart to Purchase this 8 Tomato Seed Package from The Rusted Garden. No Shipping Fees. Paypal Only.


I try to keep my gardening at zero cost though I never succeed... it is fun. These are the plants I will be growing. If your interested check out my ebay auctions. These are the seeds I will start indoors and then sell in my area for $1.


It is getting close to seed starting time. I wish you all good luck with the 2011 season.

I am auctioning 8 kinds of tomato seeds, it is a mix of all you will need for the growing season and then some. You will get small fruit, large fruit, and patio container tomato seeds. Don't forget heirlooms and different colors. Sandwich type, salad type, salsa, sauce and just plain old snacking tomatoes.

You will get 30 plus seeds of each variety below. They will each be packed in small letter envelopes and sent in a larger letter envelope. These seeds are packed for 2011 and come from bulk puchases I made from multiple seed companies. In some instances they may be seeds I colleceted from last years plants.

Have A Great Season!


The Eight Varietes You Will Get:

Black Plum (Heirloom small teardrop/Mahagony)
Small elongated-oval fruits are deep mahogany and sweet and fruity. Plants grow to 6 feet and produce through the season. Indeterminte 80 days.

Brandywine (Sudduth's) (Heirloom 2 pound fruit/Pink-Red)
This is widely known as the original Pink Brandywine strain, obtained by Ben Quisenberry from Dorris Sudduth Hill. Many gardeners consider this seed the best Brandywine with fruit that is superior in taste and smoothness. It produces 1 to 2 pound pink beefsteaks with a sweet flavor that has made popular. Indeterminate 85 days.

Delicious (2 pound fruit. I grow it every year/Red)
Huge red fruit is smooth, nearly solid and often weighs more than 2 lbs. Great taste and meaty. This is the variety that holds the world record for the largest tomato ever grown. Indeterminate 75 days.

Jersey Devil (Heirloom Salsa and Sauce/Bright Red)
A tomato variety with 4 to 6 inch long red fruits shaped like banana peppers. They taper to a point. Jersey Devil horns.The tomatoes are very meaty and sweet with few seeds. It is great for sauces, salsas, or even eating fresh. Large yeilds. Indeterminate 80 days.

Mexico (Heirloom 1 pound fruit/Pink-Red)
Very large plants have an excellent set of huge, dark pink fruits with outstanding taste. It is unusual to find a variety that bears such large fruit in generous numbers and maintains such superb taste. Plant produces 1 lbers throughout the growing season. A family heirloom brought from a Mexican family living in the Midwest. Indeterminate 80 days.

Orange Russian (Heirloom Oxheart shape/Bicolor: yellow and orange)
A bicolor oxheart tomato with 8 ozs. or more fruits. They are heart-shaped with smooth yellow flesh marbled inside and out with streaks of red. They are delicious, sweet, and meaty with very few seeds. Indeterminate 80 days.

Patio Hybrid (Your container cherry tomato/Red)
A dwarf variety for growing on patios, decks, or wherever garden space is limited. It is great for upside-down planting. Plants 2 ft. tall and produce large number 3 to 4 oz. tomatoes. Determinate 70 days.

Super Beefsteak (Your summer standard 1 pound sandwich tomato)
The tried and true beafsteak tomato that brings you 1 pound fruits.





Click Add to Cart to Purchase this 8 Tomato Seed Package from The Rusted Garden. No Shipping Fees. Paypal Only.

Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Managing the Cost of Maintaining Your Pool




Now that our basement is completed, I will not only be building a patio but will be considering a pool. The first consideration I had to take into account was that building the pool and getting supplies for the pool are two different ventures. I can't decide what to have built but I have looked into maintaining the pool. I found this site for pool supplies which offer quality swimming pool products in an easy to use web site. They offer same day, free shipping. Yes I am working backwards but wanted to know the costs of maintaining a pool.


I am interested in ensuring the pool remains clean and clear during the winter and have been researching the costs of winter pool covers. This site offers pool covers with 8, 12, and 15 year warranties. I know what wind and ice can do to covers. I also want to make sure the pool lasts. I found pool coves to be a product that can extend the life of your pool liner. It is small investment to help prevent liners from stretching. There is a lot to consider when buying and building a pool. And there is a lot to consider when maintaining your pool. This site offers a customer all they need to maintain their pool through summer and winter.

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Water Damage Can Occur Anytime




One of the benefits of blogging is that it reaches across the nation. I recently remodeled my basement and attracted the attention of my neighbor. He let me know he had a flood in his house and it wiped out the work he had done years ago. The PVC tubing in his mid level sink sprung a leak while they were both at work. Needless to say the damage was done. The damage was bad. He had  need for hardwood floor water damage repair austin.

Another problem that occurred was an increase in humidity and he needed help with basement dehumidification austin. The amount of water that poured in was incredible. Humidity increase in the entire house. Granted he was insured but the clean up was still overwhelming. Even after getting professional help there was concern of mold and odor. He wanted the house dehumidified. Carpet was damaged and he looked on line to find rug cleaning tips austin. It was a mess. Because I have plant growing closets in my basement and therefor deal with watering systems, I always keep a service like the Steam Team in mind for emergencies. Water damage is always a concern that stays on my mind.

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